‘The Flash’: “Magenta” Spoiler Recap/Review

The Flash returns with another solid episode that’s all about embracing who you are.

The Flash returns with another solid episode that’s all about embracing who you are. Things get started with Barry and Iris going on their first date. The two try to drown out the rest of the world and focus on each other but soon it becomes clear there are some things about themselves they just can’t ignore. It’s not long before they get interrupted by not only a burglary next door to the restaurant they’re dining in but an emergency call from Cisco as well.

Turns out it’s not an emergency. Just Wells and Jesse arriving through a breach from Earth-Two with a new problem: Jesse is now a speedster and she’s eager to become a superhero. Wells is terrified, understandably so, and he’ll do whatever has to be done to convince her not to use her powers.

Last year when Wells recreated the particle accelerator explosion — in order to give Barry back his powers — we saw both Jesse and Wally knocked down by the blast. We’ve been waiting to see what, if any, effect this would have on the both of them. In the Flashpoint timeline, we got Wally as a full-fledged Kid Flash, but it wasn’t until tonight that we saw what the effect the explosion had on them in the Earth One/Earth Two timeline was. While Jesse is quick, Wally is still the same. Or is he? This episode definitely gave us some hope that his power could still manifest but my guess is that Dr. Alchemy will actually give him his speed like he had in Flashpoint. He seemed pretty alarmed when Magenta mentioned Dr. Alchemy speaking to her in her dreams. Almost as if he has been hearing the same voice as well.

The villain of the week Frankie Kane A.K.A. Magenta is an abused foster child who now has the ability to control metal thanks to Dr. Alchemy. After her jerk of a foster father bothers her for the last time, Magenta sends a lamp post through her living room window — striking him in his chest.

It isn’t long before Julian Albert figures out the truth about Frankie and exposes her as a metahuman.

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Joey King as Magenta in The Flash. (The CW)

After nearly killing Julian —  followed by a bit of an implausible escape from The Flash, Magenta goes full Magneto and picks up a tanker to drop on top of the hospital where her foster father is receiving care for his injuries. Lucky for Barry, Iris is there questioning Frankie’s father about his foster daughter.

Barry races to the hospital to stop Magenta from dropping the tanker. He uses his speed to create a wind tunnel but it’s not enough. Barry can’t stop the tanker from falling and take down Magenta at the same time. Wells has struggled to fight the inevitable the entire episode but he finally embraces Jesse’s destiny and speaks the same inspiring words Eobard Thawne spoke to Barry to give him the push he needed to find the strength within himself in order to become a hero. Run Jesse, run.

When I first saw the trailer for this episode and saw Wells repeating that line, my first thought was that they are really starting to wear this line out. But in the context of the episode, not only did the line work, it was inspiring thanks to Tom Cavanaugh’s performance.

Jesse came to Barry’s aid making it possible for him to confront Magenta. While we didn’t get a climactic showdown between her and Barry, what was great about this confrontation was that it showed the kind of hero Barry truly is. Magenta is clearly a misunderstood and troubled teenager who needs somebody to care for her. Rather than using his speed and his fists, Barry was able to defeat Magenta with kindness. It was refreshing to see Magenta taken in by Team Flash as they extended their support to her instead of tossing her in a metahuman cell at Iron Heights like every other villain. Magenta seems like she could make a return later as an ally.

In an episode that was all about embracing your powers, it also showed the person who you are outside of those powers is equally as strong and important. The writers tend to focus on three major things when crafting the story each week: heart, humor, and heroics. Tonight proved the heart is equally as important as the heroics. Unfortunately for such a strong episode, it lacked the humor that made past seasons so much fun. Cisco is going through a tough time and it’s understandable but hopefully, he heals some more soon because I very much miss his clever quips and how much fun he had being a part of Team Flash. His bad attitude sticks out like a sore thumb and could become exhausting if it lasts too much longer. Other than that it was a great episode that continued to show just how much Barry has grown in the three years since he began fighting crime.

7.8 – GOOD

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‘Arrow’: “The Recruits” Review

In the second episode of season five, Oliver begins to train his recruits for Team Arrow 2.0. The episode is a mixed bag but ultimately a step backwards for the series.

In the second episode of season five, Oliver begins to train the new recruits for Team Arrow 2.0. The episode is a mixed bag but ultimately a step backward for the series.

Things kick off with Rene Ramirez A.K.A. Wild Dog chasing down a clumsy goober of a criminal. Unfortunately, Rene proves himself to be just as clumsy as he trips over a ledge — falling off of a building himself and nearly dying. Lucky for him, Green Arrow was there to catch his fall. Maybe he should give his leg some more time to heal before he’s out traversing rooftops in Star City again.

He does deserve some credit though. He doesn’t give up and that’s exactly what gets him an invitation to train with the Green Arrow.

We get to see Oliver in action as the Mayor again. It’s good to see Oliver isn’t skipping out on important meetings like he did with Queen Consolidated, ultimately costing him the company. He still doesn’t like doing press but who can blame him? What matters here is that the writers aren’t breezing over this aspect of the show. The scene in which Oliver acquires the funding for his free medical event was thin but it still felt complete. Even if it did move at the break neck pace this show is notorious for.

The first training scene proved just how much Curtis, Rene, and Evelyn have to learn. None of them were taking it seriously. Oliver had to explain to them crime fighting isn’t a game and used Laurel as an example. It was a bit ironic as he expressed the same sentiment when Laurel hit the streets as the Black Canary in an attempt to honor the life of her sister, Sara.

Surprisingly, the flashbacks were actually decent this episode. Even though they didn’t cover much, they didn’t feel half baked like they normally do. Maybe it was because the point of them was actually relevant to the training taking place in the present day storyline. In the next step of his initiation into the Bratva, Oliver had to learn to work together with the rest of the Bratva’s tryouts in order to get past some baddies and ring a bell. Oliver used this same exercise with Curtis, Rene, and Evelyn in order to teach them the only way to win is through teamwork.

It was a good lesson to teach but Oliver didn’t go about it the right way. But the bigger issue was Felicity as she undermined his authority in front of the recruits rendering his leadership completely ineffective. Oliver needed her feedback but the way she approached the issue was inappropriate. Maybe Oliver should pull her aside and give her some feedback as well.

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The episode begins to lose itself once it gets to the free medical event. First Oliver enters dressed in a suit and tie and then moments later appears in full Green Arrow gear just as a Ragman crashes the event and goes WWE on the CEO of Amertek.

After Rene gets a piece of the cloth from Ragman’s costume, Felicity goes to the Star City police department where we discover her new boyfriend is actually working as a detective. Okay… no one cares. Moving on.

Ragman wants revenge for the nuclear missile that destroyed his city, killing his family on Genesis Day. While his motives were there, the problem was the exposition got muddled by the show’s breakneck pace along with the awful voice modulation used for Ragman. Oliver has a conversation with him about the choices he’s made. The writers tried to make it something meaningful as Oliver convinces Ragman to honor the legacy of his dead father just like Oliver wants to do for himself. He even extends his hand to Ragman, offering him a place on the new team. But god no, please no. I just couldn’t understand a damn thing he was saying and by the time it was over I didn’t care. For me, Ragman is nothing more than a throwaway villain I want to forget about by tomorrow.

Diggle’s storyline this week is a bit unremarkable. He is off on assignment to secure a nuclear weapon but instead he’s taken captive by his unit after he discovers they are corrupt when they try to steal the weapon for themselves. It’s understandable people would be afraid of metahumans or evil men with mystical powers but ultimately the storyline doesn’t deliver and is extraneous the to rest of the episode’s plot. Maybe next week Diggle will reach out to Oliver for help or the weapon they have will become part of the main plot.

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Overall, the episode was not satisfying. The villain was weak and his motives were unclear until it was too late and now we are supposed to accept him as a new member of Team Arrow? Last week things seemed like they were getting back on track but this episode indicates otherwise. If the writers want to make Arrow a hit show again they need to focus back on what made the show great to begin with. Long gone are the days of Arrow traversing the rooftops of Star City with his brother Diggle taking down drug dealers and crime bosses — and thwarting terrorist attacks. The show has unfortunately become a victim of its own success after it lost focus when it became a breeding ground for other superheroes. At this point I have little hope the Arrow we all came to know and love will ever return.

6.3 – OKAY

‘Arrow’: “The Recruits” Clip

The CW has released a clip showing Oliver put the hurt on the new recruits as they fail their first test.

Team Arrow 2.0  is beginning to assemble but it looks like they have a long way to go. Ahead of tonight’s episode of Arrow, The CW has released a clip showing Oliver put the hurt on the new recruits as they fail their first test.

Star City is too crime ridden for one man to take it all on himself so Oliver has recruited Curtis Holt, Rene Ramirez and Evelyn Sharp to join his crusade.

Arrow has gotten a lot of flack for the last two seasons as it strayed away from its roots and took on a lighter tone but things seem to be getting back to normal as the style of season one was back in the premiere and seems to be so in tonights episode as well.

Arrow airs tonight at 8 p.m. ET/PT on The CW.

‘Arrow’: Wild Dog to Join Crossover

Yesterday, actor Rick Gonzales tweeted out a photo of Wild Dog’s hockey mask set next to Flash’s mask. In an interview with comicbook.com, Rick confirmed Wild Dog’s involvement in the upcoming three part crossover event. I can’t say I’m a fan of the character or that I’m excited about him joining Team Arrow but what Rick had to say definitely piqued my interest. He wasn’t able to comment on his involvement in the crossover but he did comment on the dynamic he will have with Team Arrow and the metahumans from the other DC shows.

I can’t speak on that, but what I can say is that Wild Dog will be in the crossover, and he has a huge dislike for metahumans. So we’ll definitely see him not exactly rub well with The Flash and Supergirl and that’s just another glimpse into his psyche and his ideas and thinking about the world and the idea that there are people out there who have these sort of powers and who they are. Instead of saying ’Wow, these people can do these things,’ he says, ‘no, I don’t like you because this is what you bring to the table. This is what you represent to me.’

In the comics, ‘Wild Dog’ was a star athlete named Jack Wheeler who joined the marines after he sustained a sports injury forcing him off the team—losing his football scholarship—leaving him unable to pay his tuition. His tour with the U.S. Marines was cut short after his comrades were killed by a terrorist bomb. He returned home and ended up falling in love with the daughter of a mob boss who was later on killed.

While Arrow has changed the name of the character from Jack Wheeler to Rene Ramirez, it seems his origin is still grounded in the roots of the source material. Gonzales spoke to TV Guide about Rene’s background, which character he might be closest to because of his past, and the inspiration for his costume.

Wild Dog is ex-military and we’ll soon find out why he’s no longer military and some of the issues he’s had to deal with personally. … Being ex-military, we see he is someone who knows how to handle himself, but has caused a lot of problems in his life, so he’s made things a little bit more difficult in terms of trying to help people and do the right thing. We’ll also find out about his family life and what kind of caused him to have this energy, this darkness, that doesn’t create the best teammate.

On which member he will be closest to:

I think Wendy Mericle mentioned not too long ago that Diggle (David Ramsey) was going to have a connection to Wild Dog. I thought it was really great and interesting that she brought it up, because I think if there would be anyone that Wild Dog would maybe even want to let his guard down or try to connect with, it would be John Diggle. Because throughout the entire show, he’s been the person who has the most reason and always spoke from his heart and who’s always been able to get his point across to every single character on the show. That type of energy, I think Wild Dog would respond well to.

And the inspiration for his costume:

I don’t know much except that it mirrors exactly what we see in the comics, which I thought was really cool. We do know in the comic book that Jack Wheeler is Wild Dog and he’s ex-military and also an ex-football player. But I don’t know if [Rene Ramirez’s] jersey has anything to do with him being an ex-football player or anything of that nature. But I think it’s really cool that Marc Guggenheim and everyone else decided to stay close to what he looks like in the comic book and bring that to the screen. I think the fans are going to get a kick out of that.

To read the full interview head on over to TVGuide.com

Arrow airs Wednesdays at 8 p.m. ET/PT on The CW.

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NYCC 2016: ‘Justice League’ BTS Video

Warner Brothers has released an exciting behind the scenes look at the upcoming ‘Justice League’ to celebrate the film wrapping production. The studio has their work cut out for them as they attempt to win audiences back after the negative reception to Batman V. Superman: Dawn of Justice. We’ve already gotten to see a trailer plus reports from the press from their set visit a few months ago. The trailer plus this new behind the scenes look indicates a lighter tone and a general sense of the film being more fun than the dark and dire tone of the previous entries to the D.C. extended universe.

Check out the video below. There looks to be some great action and the cast looks like they had a blast making the film. It’s also nice to see the entire crew recognized for their hard work at the end. I don’t know about you, but this actually gets me excited to see the film now.

Justice League hits theaters November 17, 2017.

Fueled by his restored faith in humanity and inspired by Superman’s selfless act, Bruce Wayne enlists the help of his newfound ally, Diana Prince, to face an even greater enemy. Together, Batman and Wonder Woman work quickly to find and recruit a team of metahumans to stand against this newly awakened threat. But despite the formation of this unprecedented league of heroes—Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Cyborg and The Flash—it may already be too late to save the planet from an assault of catastrophic proportions.